Cariolis: Car Reviews


2014 Toyota RAV4 Compact Crossover Review and Road Test

By Alex on Autos

The big change for 2014 out back. It's not what you see, it's what you don't. The spare tire that clung to the back of the 2013 model like an octogenarian clinging to the past is gone. The removal of the tire makes completes the RAV4′s exterior transformation from Toyota Trucklet to crossover. By going hatch-mainstream, practicality is greatly improved allowing easier access when parallel parked or parked on a hill. Because of the RAV's increased dimensions and the new hatch, it is possible to fit 4×8 sheets inside if you leave the hatch cracked. The RAV4′s cargo hold has one of the lowest lift-over heights for loading in the compact crossover segment. While this makes loading easier, it means the hatch is closer to the ground and makes opening it more awkward. I thought I was alone, but some of our Facebook friends commented that the hatch hit them in the abdomen if they didn't take a large step backwards when opening it. Toyota decided to kill off optional V6 for 2014, leaving the 2.5L four-cylinder the only powerplant. While the switch is likely to offend a few, the vast majority of RAV4 sales were four-cylinder anyway. Toyota's logic was this: the prime competitor is the CR-V and it's four-cylinder only. The 2.5L engine is good for 176 horsepower and 172 lb-ft of twist placing it in the thick of the competition. Since the 2.5L is no longer the base engine Toyota fitted it with their 6-speed automatic transaxle to improve performance and fuel economy. MPGs rise to 24 City and 31 Highway in FWD trim which is above the CR-V and GM crossovers but well below the Mazda CX-5′s impressive 26/35 score (2.0L engine and manual transmission.) For $1,400 Toyota will toss in their full-time AWD system on any trim level. The RAV4′s AWD system follows the same formula as the rest with a multi-plate coupling acting as a quasi center differential. This system is somewhat unusual however because the driver can lock the coupling on demand via a button in the dash. Although the lock will self-disengage over 25MPH, only the Jeep crossovers offer a similar touch. Engaging the car's "sport" mode alters the throttle mapping, transmission shift points and encourages the coupling to lock more frequently to try and limit the FWD nature of the RAV. Toyota has a history of playing to the "meat" of every segment. Rarely does Toyota build anything extreme, be it the cheapest car in its class, the most expensive, fastest, slowest, etc. That describes the RAV4 to a tee. After a week with the RAV4 I wasn't offended but neither was I enraptured. Toyota's trucklet is reasonably priced ranging from $23,300-$28,410 and in most trims represents a decent (but not extreme) value compared to the competition. Yes, the CX-5 is more exciting, but like the more luxurious and gadget-rich Escape, it'll cost you more. The CR-V is quieter but it's also a few bucks more expensive. The Cherokee is more off-road capable but Chrysler's reliability reputation isn't exactly stellar. The Forester is the better choice for wagon lovers and the Sportage and Escape have powerful turbo options that speak to my heart. The GMC Terrain and Chevy Equinox have been refreshed and feature 301 horsepower mills for those that like to count ponies and an infotainment system that's more attractive than Entune. The new RAV is, without a doubt, a better 2-row crossover than the model it replaces. It's also a very pragmatic choice delivering a blend of good fuel economy, large cargo hold, an AWD system that's more capable than most in the segment and, being a Toyota, it's likely to have a good reliability record as well. The 2014 RAV4 is a solid crossover and you can't go wrong by putting one in your driveway. If however you want my advice, and since you're reading this I assume you do, check out the CX-5 and Escape before you sign on the dotted line. Statistics powered by ChannelMeter http://channelmeter.com


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